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Leveraging Your Intellectual Strengths in Voice Overs

By Stephanie Ciccarelli

September 2, 2010

Comments (4)

Surgeon examining a girl's neckHas voice over been your only field of study and profession?

Most people become voice artists after they have already had a career or pursued studies in a different field.

That being said, you can consider your education and work experience, even special interests, as relevant information stored in your mind that could help you shape and define your niche as a voice over artist!

Learn more about how you can go about defining your niche in today's VOX Daily.

Finding Your Way

This morning I answered an email from someone who was an medical doctor. They were asking me how to best position themselves and promote their voice over demo. I've included my reply below.

Even if you aren't a doctor turned voice artist, what is being shared could very well be of use to you.

Specialize

Since you have a background in medicine, I think you should be targeting medical narration as field of specialization for voice over narration. Have you considered sending your CDs to companies that do those kind of presentations or training materials? There are companies that create technologies that doctors use in their practices, research and surgeries. Oftentimes these companies need narration for videos, tutorials and training manuals.

Research

I was just speaking with someone the other day who is in this field (his company makes tools that help doctors know the degree or severity of a condition) and part of their process was that they had to visit all of their customers in person to demonstrate how the tools worked. Traveling to do these presentations in person costs a lot of money. I asked him if they were considering making videos or online tutorials and he said they were. I then asked if narration might be part of that project and discovered that it most definitely would be.

Avenues exist if you know where to look for them.

Prepare Your Pitch

Search for companies who make tools for those in the health care field. You already know their jargon and could easily apply your technical expertise in this way for them without having to be prepped on the terminology and save them time and money as the need for revisions would be fewer or nonexistent.

Getting Your Voice Into Their Head

Before you send them a sample recording of your voice, it is wise to make a personal contact first, determine that it is in fact the right person to be receiving the package, and then ask their permission to send a CD in the mail. Alternatively, you could provide a link to your demos online and avoid having to ship something or sending annoying file attachments. Never email an MP3 unless the prospective customer says you can.

Take advantage of the niche you have the most experience servicing and see how that goes!

How Do You Research Potential Clients?

If you've managed to hone this skill and have any tips to share on how to define your niche and research prospects, I'd love to hear from you.

Best wishes,

Stephanie

©iStockphoto.com/Dmitry Obukhov

Related Topics: acting, how to, narration, niche market, promotion, voice overs, voice talent, Voices.com


Comments


    Excellent advice Stephanie. I'm finding that my family background in medicine heavily influenced my capabilities in speaking medical jargon easily and fluently. My Dad's a physician, 1 sister is a med tech, my brother in law's an Opthalmologist, and two sisters were in nursing.

    That, along with my recent certification as a medical narration expert wins me a number of gigs in this specific field.
    You're right, there's always more to be done in niche marketing, which this article has inspired me to concentrate on.
    All The Best,
    Bobbin Beam

    Posted by:

      Hello Stephanie,

      I had to write and compliment you on this post--a great example of how to look at voiceover through the lens of your particular "voice of experience." For me, it's the "best percentage" approach for reaching those who are looking for the best, most authentic service I have to offer. This is the way I approach the audition board--frankly, I'm not interested in car commercials, on-hold messages, or movie trailers--there are many other voices that already do these things, and do them better than I could. I've used my experience first in radio and in my current career as an educator to prove to clients that mine is a voice that can "reach and teach" their target audience--it's something I do every day with students, fellow faculty and peers in the field, parents and families. Thank you for your continued insights and advice!


      Posted by:

        That is what an agent is for...I make sure they earn their 15%

        Posted by:
        • Nick Montague
        • May 24, 2011 4:48 PM

          Only if I want a background into how to pronounce the name of the company or some nugget of info that will help the audition.

          Posted by:
          • David A. Bucci
          • May 28, 2011 5:11 PM

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